la-negra-barbuda:

Afroboricua photographer Sandra Andino, of negraluz.com, talks about the importance of media representation for afrolatin@s.

Interracial" is not synonymous with "anti-racism.

bell hooks, “Lecture at Texas A&M” (via blackinasia)

gjmueller:

Segregated Housing, Segregated Schools

School reform alone cannot substantially raise performance of the poorest African-American students unless we also improve the conditions that leave too many children unprepared to take advantage of what schools have to offer.
Social and economic disadvantage depresses student performance; concentrating disadvantaged students in racially and economically homogeneous schools depresses it further.

gjmueller:

Segregated Housing, Segregated Schools

School reform alone cannot substantially raise performance of the poorest African-American students unless we also improve the conditions that leave too many children unprepared to take advantage of what schools have to offer.

Social and economic disadvantage depresses student performance; concentrating disadvantaged students in racially and economically homogeneous schools depresses it further.

When Latin feminists within the AFD failed to do likewise, [Dr. Evangelina] Rodríguez acknowledged the needs of poor women and encouraged elite and aspiring Petromacorisanas to do the same. From 1925 until her death in 1947, Rodríguez worked tirelessly advocating for free health care for poor women and children living in San Pedro and its nearby rural districts. In the field, Rodríguez blended her medical and normalista training, teaching informal classes on basic hygiene and instructing midwives on ways to prevent infections during and after childbirth. She also established health clinics where she treated patients suffering from the endemic disease of poverty – tuberculosis and leprosy. She operated the Centre for the Protection of Maternity and Infancy from where she distributed milk donated by local farmers to poor women and children. Rodríguez and other female activists coaxed – sometimes aggressively prodded and shamed – San Pedro’s city council into funding a maternity hospital, which opened in 1929. Rodríguez even included ‘fallen women’ into her vision of public health when she dispensed free contraceptives to prostitutes whose venereal diseases she also treated, despite criticism from San Pedro’s public health establishment. That Rodríguez’s work influenced local elite and aspiring women is unquestioned: in 1929, for instance, San Pedro’s Feminine League courageously held a trinket sale in the central park to publicise their anti-syphilis campaign.

Thanks to Rodríguez’s leadership, activist women in San Pedro made important strides in providing healthcare to poor people. Rodríguez and other activist women also pushed Dominican feminist practice in potentially radical directions because their work directed attention to a larger system of inequality that oppressed poor women of colour on the basis of class, colour and gender. Rodríguez’s radical insight, perhaps a result of her training in Paris, was to understand the unequal distribution of healthcare as evidence that female subordination was a structural problem rooted in poverty, racism and political disenfranchisement. Rodríguez’s personal experiences also dramatically underscored this reality. Despite her brilliance as a doctor and social activist, locals often ridiculed Rodríguez as a ‘black’ and ‘ugly woman’ because she preferred braiding her hair and wearing Oxford shoes – as opposed to heels. Rodríguez reportedly surmised that, ‘because I don’t have a husband, a man to protect me, they accuse me of being a lesbian. I get poison pen letters under my door. Even in the street when I pass by, people throw insults at me’. Rodríguez’s activism, African heritage and her singleness positioned her much like the poor women she tended, as someone beyond the boundaries of acceptable, Dominican womanhood and the Latin Dominican nation.

Why Dominican Feminism Moved to the Right: Class, Colour and Women’s Activism in the Dominican Republic, 1880s–1940s

(via baddominicana)

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

excerpt from “FYI, I Cannot “Demand” Respect From Men so Stop Telling Me That!" @ One Black Girl. Many Words.  (via fajazo)

(via angimia)

Submissions Call: For Harriet

writingopps:

For Harriet is and online community for women of African ancestry. We encourage women, through storytelling and journalism, to engage in candid, revelatory dialogue about the beauty and complexity of Black womanhood. We aspire to educate, inspire, and entertain.

For Harriet seeks to raise…

If it arrives you know. If you know it really has come, then you have to put it down

Toni Morroson (via angiewrites)